Upcoming Events & Exhibitions

In Residence: Temjai Cholsiri  March 18-April 14 2019  Temjai Cholsiri’s work originates from her religious beliefs. Her sculptures represent consciousness and concentration, core aspects of meditative practices; forming the body in a state of balance through focusing on what is happening in the present time, which is the path to the Cessation of Suffering. Found objects, art, and non-art materials are employed to create tension and maintain balance through the assemblage and installation of her art. The process of making Cholsiri’s artwork is the practice of meditation. It requires the same patience and dedication through balancing small, fragile pieces to form large-scale sculptures. The structural form in her work reflects the creation of identity; being mindful, conscious and aware, growing up, and regarding oneself. The instability of her sculptures reflects the life experiences of arising, sustaining and falling. Her aim is to unite her culture with contemporary art practice in a way that challenges notions of difference and equality.

In Residence: Temjai Cholsiri

March 18-April 14 2019

Temjai Cholsiri’s work originates from her religious beliefs. Her sculptures represent consciousness and concentration, core aspects of meditative practices; forming the body in a state of balance through focusing on what is happening in the present time, which is the path to the Cessation of Suffering. Found objects, art, and non-art materials are employed to create tension and maintain balance through the assemblage and installation of her art. The process of making Cholsiri’s artwork is the practice of meditation. It requires the same patience and dedication through balancing small, fragile pieces to form large-scale sculptures. The structural form in her work reflects the creation of identity; being mindful, conscious and aware, growing up, and regarding oneself. The instability of her sculptures reflects the life experiences of arising, sustaining and falling. Her aim is to unite her culture with contemporary art practice in a way that challenges notions of difference and equality.

Spring Residency 2019   Hayley Dawson // Zolatrope  with Hanna Tuuliiki / Leila Smith / Cameron Mackay  15/04/19 - 19/05/19  Hayley Dawson and Zolatrope (Zoe Pillar and Lola Morgan), with (GSA’s only female technician and former Atelier Monday mentee) artist Leila Smith and Finnish artist Hanna Tuulikki working in mentor and pastoral care roles and explorer Cameron Mackay curating an expedition and self-care workshop.  Dawson’s work sculptural work is rooted in the site of conflict that arises from experiences during her childhood and her identity as an adult and a queer Scottish female. Dawson’s work is often autobiographical, frequently using her own body as a channel through which to explore her relationship with the landscape - rural or otherwise - ritual and memory, tracing the artist’s own association with undocumented queer/lesbian histories as a means of subversion and denial.  Zolatrope’s collaborative practice developed from questioning their relationship to space and site, the choreography of movements and actions, and finding a parallel interest in ecology and disconnection to place. They question ‘Rites of Passage’, and if our contemporary culture is lacking because we don’t engage with this collectively engrained system and ritual. Rite of Passage becomes a navigational tool to foster a more considered connection to their environment.

Spring Residency 2019

Hayley Dawson // Zolatrope

with Hanna Tuuliiki / Leila Smith / Cameron Mackay

15/04/19 - 19/05/19

Hayley Dawson and Zolatrope (Zoe Pillar and Lola Morgan), with (GSA’s only female technician and former Atelier Monday mentee) artist Leila Smith and Finnish artist Hanna Tuulikki working in mentor and pastoral care roles and explorer Cameron Mackay curating an expedition and self-care workshop.

Dawson’s work sculptural work is rooted in the site of conflict that arises from experiences during her childhood and her identity as an adult and a queer Scottish female. Dawson’s work is often autobiographical, frequently using her own body as a channel through which to explore her relationship with the landscape - rural or otherwise - ritual and memory, tracing the artist’s own association with undocumented queer/lesbian histories as a means of subversion and denial.

Zolatrope’s collaborative practice developed from questioning their relationship to space and site, the choreography of movements and actions, and finding a parallel interest in ecology and disconnection to place. They question ‘Rites of Passage’, and if our contemporary culture is lacking because we don’t engage with this collectively engrained system and ritual. Rite of Passage becomes a navigational tool to foster a more considered connection to their environment.

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